Finishing The Interior On The 1979 Monte Carlo

I’ve been moving forward as much as possible with the 1979 Monte Carlo that I’ve been working on.  The interior is just about complete, the only things that need to get done are the Headliner trim (I have ordered the clips I need), the interior dome light, and the parking brake release lever.  The rest of the interior is complete.  Since I’ve already posted on the trim pieces and the stereo install I will just cover the other items that were restored.

The dash was in pretty good shape and was just a little rough from 30+ years out in the open.  I decided to tape up the windows and black sections of the dash and paint it in place without taking it out.  I also taped up the passenger and driver side windows and painted the top door panels in place.  They were giving me a hard time taking them off so I left them there.  I used old newspaper and painters tape and just painted them using the interior paint that I have been using.  I don’t have a full picture of the dash after paint except for at the end.  If you scroll all the way down, the finished product is there.

Dash Before Paint And Stereo

Dash Before Paint And Stereo

Painted Upper Door Panels

Painted Upper Door Panels

Painted Center Dash Area

Painted Center Dash Area

 

Next up was the seats.  The back seat was pretty easy to restore because it just consisted of cleaning it up the best I could and putting a coat of paint on it.

Rear Seats Before Repair

Rear Seats Before Repair

More Before Repair

More Before Repair

Rear Seats After Repair

Rear Seats After Repair

The front seats were a little more involved!  I needed to repair a tear in the front bench seat.  I used a needle and thread to perform the repair.  I originally tried to use a vinyl repair kit but was unsuccessful and the repair looked terrible.  That’s when I decided to sew the seam back together.  After the sewing was done, you can find instructions on how to sew on you tube pretty easily, I used Liquid Stitch to sort of glue the repair and hopefully make it stronger.  I also used the Liquid Stitch product to cover the other minor tears in the seat.  Once all the repairs were dry, I waited a couple of days but it probably could have been done in a couple of hours, I painted the bench seat with the interior paint.

Liquid Stitch

Tear In The Front Seat

Tear In The Front Seat

Repaired Seam

Repaired Seam

Liquid Stitch On The Side Of The Seat

Liquid Stitch On The Side Of The Seat

Finished Front Seat

Finished Front Seat

 

The carpet was next, first I laid out the carpet to get a good fit and to make sure it would go in nicely.  Once I had it laid out properly, I let it rest for a day or two to get the shape of the floor in it.  I was just following the instructions that came with the carpet.  After I was satisfied of the carpet installation, I made the necessary holes in the carpet for the front seat mounts and all the seatbelt installs.  I then tucked the carpet under the trim and admired my handy work.

Carpet Mocked Up

Carpet Mocked Up

I Cut The Carpet With A Utility Knife To Make Way For The Bolts. I Used An X Pattern.

I Cut The Carpet With A Utility Knife To Make Way For The Bolts. I Used An X Pattern.

 

I then installed the bench seat and realized that I had pretty much finished the inside of the car.  I then noticed that the guage cluster was a little shabby looking so I took it out and painted it black.  Once it dried, I installed it back in the car and the results are as follows!

Finished Front

Finished Front

Finished Back

Finished Back

Finished Dash

Finished Dash

Finished Door Panel

Finished Door Panel

There are a few minor trim pieces that still need to get installed but it is pretty much done, or at least that is all I’m doing to it.  Remember, the idea is to keep the cost down and end up with a nice cruiser.

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